Plan Now for Your 2018 Monarch Butterfly Garden

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The Monarch Butterfly is probably one of the most recognizable butterflies in North America.  It is in trouble! Monarch populations have been declining for a number of years. The loss of food (nectar) plants and milkweeds has been indicated as a major contributor to these declines. By growing nectar sources and milkweeds, which are host plants for the monarch, you can help to offset these losses. To assist in the conservation of the monarch butterfly, we have created two seed mixes:

Monarch Butterfly Garden Mix – this is composed of wildflowers, garden flowers and milkweeds. Plant it in most areas of the U.S. and southern Canada. It is recommended for home gardens, golf courses, parks, businesses and other maintained garden sites.

Native Flower Mix for Monarchs this is composed entirely of wildflowers and milkweeds that are native to the Midwest. It is useful for planting in the summer breeding range and flyway zones in the Midwestern part of North America. It is recommended for meadow plantings, roadsides, and revegetation projects.

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Featured Flower: Dwarf Helenium (Helenium amarum)

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One of our native wildflowers, Helenium amarum, comes from the genus, Helenium, believed to be named after Helen of Troy. The species name, amarum, means bitter, which refers to the bitter taste of the plants. Other common names are Bitterweed, American Bitterweed and Bitter Sneezeweed.

 

Dwarf Helenium is a native annual from Texas, the Southeastern and Midwestern U.S. It is typically found in prairies, pastures, woodland openings and along roadsides. Plants grow to 12 inches high, have a mounding habit and have very fine, thread-like leaves. They have bright yellow flowers and are very long-blooming; flowering occurs from summer through early fall.

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We’ve got a new website!

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We here at Applewood Seed Company are so excited to finally have the opportunity to show off our new website!  It has been a long time in the making, and a lot more effort than we originally expected, but it is finally here.  Even more exciting is that we are not done yet.  We are […]

Breaking Dormancy – – Cold Stratification

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In many parts of the Northern Hemisphere right now nature is busy breaking seed dormancy through the application of cold and moisture. Some seeds, often perennials, exhibit dormancy or “the incapacity of a viable seed to germinate under favorable conditions.”(1)  Dormancy fulfills an important function for plants since it allows seeds to survive conditions and […]

More New Garden Flowers

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We have added some colorful, favorite garden flowers to our offerings this year. Lobelia ‘Crystal Palace’ (Lobelia erinus) is an old-fashioned annual favorite that can be used for rock gardens, beds, border edges and containers. The compact plants have deep blue flowers that bloom all summer long and can be planted in full sun or […]

New Garden Everlastings

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New for 2016 are a variety of flowers known as “everlastings” or, in France, as “immortelles.” These are flowers that keep their color and form when they are dried. Many of these species have colorful, papery petals or bracts that are dry and stiff while still attached to the living plant.

New Natives for 2016

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Desert Penstemon (Penstemon pseudospectabilis) is a perennial that is native to southern California,  Arizona and western New Mexico.  The rose colored flowers last for many weeks and are spectacular when planted in large groups.  Desert Penstemon is perfect for the western Xeriscape garden and pollinator plantings.   The flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, honey bees and […]

Fall Bloomers – Perennials

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Although the name New England Aster seems to imply that this plant is only native to the northeast, this fall-blooming perennial is actually native to most of the United States and much of Canada. It prefers full sun and moist soils. This is one of the showiest asters, blooming from late August into October and attaining a […]